Fact Sheet on Georgia Gun Laws and Statistics on Gun Violence in Georgia

For Release: Friday, July 30, 1999

This fact sheet provides background information for journalists covering yesterday’s shooting at an Atlanta, Georgia office complex.

Georgia Firearm Laws1

  • No licensing or registration requirements related to purchase or possession of any firearms.
  • “Instant” background check with no mandatory waiting period for purchase of handguns, shotguns, or rifles.
  • “May-issue” concealed handgun licensing system under which county judges may issue concealed carry permits to individuals over the age of 21 with no criminal record or history of mental illness. Georgia also allows persons with valid hunting or fishing licenses to carry handguns provided they are openly carried when loaded.
  • Reciprocal concealed carry law allowing persons with concealed handgun licenses issued by other states to carry handguns in Georgia, provided that the state recognizes Georgia concealed handgun licenses.
  • The city of Atlanta has filed a lawsuit against the gun industry seeking compensation for the damages inflicted on it by firearm-related violence. Governor Roy Barnes recently signed a law that would invalidate the lawsuit. Atlanta Mayor Bill Campbell has vowed to challenge the constitutionality of this law.

Firearm-Related Death in Georgia

  • In 1996 Georgia ranked 11th in rate of firearm-related death, with a rate of 16.94 per 100,000. In 1996 the national rate of firearm-related death was 12.94 per 100,000.2
  • In 1996 Georgia ranked ninth in rate of firearm-related homicide, with a rate of 7.61 per 100,000. In 1996 the national rate of firearm-related homicide was 6.02 per 100,000.3
  • In 1996 Georgia ranked 21st in rate of firearm-related suicide,, with a rate of 8.27 per 100,000. In 1996 the national rate of firearm-related suicide was 6.29 per 100,000.4

1) Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, State Laws and Published Ordinances, 1998.

2) National Center for Health Statistics Compressed Mortality File 1996, accessed through the CDC Wonder system from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention web site at wonder.cdc.gov. Population numbers from Demo-Detail postcensal estimates. Rankings compiled by the Violence Policy Center.

3) National Center for Health Statistics Compressed Mortality File 1996, accessed through the CDC Wonder system from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention web site at wonder.cdc.gov. Population numbers from Demo-Detail postcensal estimates. Rankings compiled by the Violence Policy Center.

4) National Center for Health Statistics Compressed Mortality File 1996, accessed through the CDC Wonder system from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention web site at wonder.cdc.gov. Population numbers from Demo-Detail postcensal estimates. Rankings compiled by the Violence Policy Center.

 

 

 

About the Violence Policy Center
The Violence Policy Center is a national educational organization working to stop gun death and injury. Follow the VPC on TwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

 

 

About the Violence Policy Center
The Violence Policy Center is a national educational organization working to stop gun death and injury. Follow the VPC on TwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Media Contact:
Sally Martinelli
(202) 822-8200 x104
smartinelli@vpc.org


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